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Gowthaminursery
Kadiyam to veeravaram road,
Near dosalamma temple,           gowthaminursery@gmail.com
kadiyapulanka,
East Godavari dst, AP.                             +91 94404 90209
pin – 533126                        

Bamboo is a group of perennial evergreens in the true grass family Poaceae, subfamily Bambusoideae, tribe Bambuseae. Giant bamboos are thelargest members of the grass family.n bamboo, the internodal regions of the stem are hollow and the vascular bundles in the cross section are scattered throughout the stem instead of in a cylindrical arrangement. The dicotyledonous woody xylem is also absent. The absence of secondary growth wood causes the stems of monocots, even of palms and large bamboos, to be columnar rather than tapering. Bamboos are some of the fastest growing plants in the world, as some species are capable of growing 100 cm (39 in) or more per day due to a unique rhizome-dependent system. However, the growth rate is partially dependent on local soil and climatic conditions. Bamboos are of notable economic and cultural significance in South Asia, South East Asia and East Asia, being used for building materials, as a food source, and as a versatile raw product. There are more than 70 genera divided into about 1,450 species.Bamboo are found in diverse climates, from cold mountains to hot tropical regions.

Growth

Bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants on Earth; it has been measured surging skyward as fast as 100 cm (39 in) in a 24-hour period.Primarily growing in regions of warmer climates during the Cretaceous period, vast fields existed in what is now Asia. Bamboo is also known to be able to grow over 30 metres (98 ft) tall. months. During this first season, the clump of young shoots grows vertically, with no branching. In the next year, the pulpy wall of each culm or stem slowly dries and hardens. The culm begins to sprout branches and leaves from each node. During the third year, the culm further hardens. The shoot is now considered a fully mature culm. Over the next 2–5 years (depending on species), fungus and mold begin to form on the outside of the culm, which eventually penetrate and overcome the culm. Around 5 – 8 years later (species and climate dependent), the fungal and mold growth cause the culm to collapse and decay. This brief life means culms are ready for harvest and suitable for use in construction within about 3 – 7 years.

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